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Career Opportunities in Blockchain and The Top Jobs You Need to Know

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Article originally posted on Data Science Central. Visit Data Science Central

Blockchain expertise is one of the fastest-growing skills and demand for blockchain professionals is picking up momentum in the USA. Since crypto-currencies are doing well for the last few years and many investors are looking at investing in them, the demand for blockchain engineers is growing. Blockchain technology certifications have become very popular in the last few years.

The Growing Demands for Blockchain Specialists

Demand for Blockchain professionals is increasing and blockchain technology certifications are quite popular courses in institutes and universities. Globally, according to Glassdoor, the demand for blockchain professionals grew by 300% in 2019 as compared to 2018 and this increase is expected to grow in the years to come.

With the arrival of cryptocurrencies, this disruptive technology called blockchain became a hot-cake in the IT world. It is estimated that by 2023, $15.9 billion would have been invested in blockchain solutions worldwide. Now to attract that kind of investment, there should be an ample number of blockchains.

The food and agriculture industry and many other industries are developing solutions based on blockchain technology. With the rising focus on digital transformation, this technology is set to enter many other industries beyond the financial sector.

The Top Blockchain Jobs you Need to Know About

• Blockchain Developer- Blockchain developers need to have a lot of experience with C++, Python, and JavaScript programming languages. There are many companies like IBM, Cygnet Global Solutions, and AirAsia, etc. which are hiring blockchain developers across the globe.

• Blockchain Quality Engineer- In the Blockchain world, a blockchain engineer assures that the quality assurance is in place and the testing before releasing the product is done thoroughly. Since spikes in buying and selling trends in a day are common in the blockchain industry, the platforms need to be robust to take the load.

• Blockchain Project Managers- Blockchain project managers mostly come from a development background of C, C++, Java and they possess excellent communication skills. They need to have hands-on experience as a traditional (cloud) project manager. If they understand the complete software development life-cycle (SDLC) of the blockchain world, they can get a highly paid job in the market.

• Blockchain Solution Architect- The Blockchain Solution Architect is responsible for designing, assigning, connecting, and hand-holding in implementing all the blockchain solution components with the team experts. The blockchain developers, network administrators, blockchain engineers, UX designers, and IT Operations need to work in tandem as per the SDLC plan and execute the blockchain solution.

• Blockchain Legal Consultant- Since blockchains in the financial sector involves the exchange of money in the form of crypto-currencies; it is obvious that there will be a lot of litigation and abnormalities. Since these currencies operate in peer-to-peer networks and Governments have very limited visibility to the transactions, there will be a lot of fraudulent activities, money-laundering cases which will happen through them. Hence there will always be demand for blockchain legal consultants, as it is a new field. It needs an in-depth understanding of the technology and how the financial world revolves around it.

Top companies hiring blockchain professionals

• IBM- They hire blockchain developers, blockchain solution architects across the globe in their offices.
• Topal- This is a great platform for freelance blockchain engineers and developers to select their projects and do them from any part of the globe. There are many fortune 500 companies that are exploring the options of hiring freelance blockchain developers.
• Gemini Trust Company, LLC- New York, USA
• Circle Internet Financial Limited- Boston, Massachusetts, USA
• Coinbase Global Inc. – No headquarter

Top Blockchain Certifications for Professionals in 2021

CBCA certifications (Business Blockchain Professional, Certified Blockchain Engineer)
• Certified Blockchain Expert courses from IvanOnTech are quite economical and ideal for beginners.
• Blockchain Certification Course (CBP) — EC Council (International Council of E-Commerce Consultants)

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Binding Cloud, PLM 2.0, and Industry 4.0 into cohesive digital transformation

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Article originally posted on Data Science Central. Visit Data Science Central

In the environment of Industry 4.0, the role of PLM is expanding. The interplay between PLM and Industry 4.0 technologies – like the Internet of Things (IoT), Big Data, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Machine Learning, AR/VR, Model-Based Enterprise (MBE), and 3D Printers – is on the rise. But Industry 4.0 is unlike any previous industrial revolution. The last three, from 1.0 to 3.0, were aimed at driving innovation in manufacturing. 4.0 is different. It is changing the way of thinking. And PLM is at the heart of this new way of thinking.

Industry 4.0 is marked by pervasive connectedness. Smart devices, sensors, and systems are connected, creating a digital thread across Supply Chain Management (SCM), Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), and Customer Experience (CX) applications. This demands that new digital PLM solutions be placed at the core, making it the key enabler of digital transformation.

However, organizations cannot take a big bang approach to digital transformation – or, by implication, to PLM. Issam Darraj, ELIT Head Engineering Applications at ABB Electrification, says that organizations need to take this one step at a time. They need to first build the foundation for digital transformation, then create a culture that supports it. They should invest in skills and collaboration, focus on change management, become customer-centric, and should be able to sell anytime anywhere. Simultaneously, PLM must evolve into PLM 2.0 as well.

PLM 2.0 is widely seen as a platform whose responsibility does not end when a design is handed over to manufacturing. PLM 2.0 impacts operations, marketing, sales, services, end-of-life, recycling, etc. What began as an engineering database with MCAD and ECAD, is now an enabler of new product design, with features such as Bill of Material, collaboration, and release processes rolled into it.

As the role of PLM evolves, it is moving to Cloud. We believe that SaaS PLM is the future. This is because Cloud is central to Industry 4.0.  With connected systems and products sending back a flood of real-time data to design, operations, and support functions, Cloud has become the backbone for data and to drive real-time decisions. Organizations that were once using Cloud to bring down costs must change that focus. Availability and scalability should be the primary considerations.

Digital Transformation, Industry 4.0 technologies, PLM and Cloud are complex pieces of the puzzle. Most organizations need partners who understand every individual piece of the puzzle and know how to bring them together to create a picture of a successful, competitive, and customer-focused organization. An experienced partner will be able to connect assets, create data-rich decisioning systems, leverage Industry 4.0 technologies, and leverage Cloud to expand the role of PLM.

 

Author:

Sundaresh Shankaran

President, Manufacturing & CPG,

ITC Infotech

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Presentation: Server-Side WASM: Today and Tomorrow

MMS Founder
MMS Connor Hicks

Article originally posted on InfoQ. Visit InfoQ

Transcript

Hicks: My name is Connor Hicks. I’m a senior developer at 1Password, in the product discovery team. I’m here to talk about WebAssembly in a way that might not be familiar to some of you, and that is WebAssembly on the server. WebAssembly is traditionally a browser based technology. It actually has quite an interesting potential on the server side. I’m going to talk about server-side Wasm as it is today, and what it could be in the future. We’ll cover Wasm today. We’ll cover Wasm runtimes. We’ll look at Wasm at the edge, which is an interesting set of functionality by a couple of different cloud vendors. Then we’ll talk about Wasm on the server and all the different potential that it has in that context.

Wasm Today – Major Browser Support

Wasm today is something you might be more familiar with, it’s the more traditional context that WebAssembly is talked about, and that is using WebAssembly to compile code that isn’t JavaScript, generally, to be used in the web browser. A great example of this is our 1Password X browser extension, has been using Rust compiled to WebAssembly for a long time. The engine that analyzes your web pages and determines where to fill in your various 1Password items like your logins and your passwords, that’s been a WebAssembly module for quite a while now. We saw an order of magnitude increase in performance when we adopted that method, actually. Some other examples are Blazor, which is a C# way of building web applications. Vugu, which is Go. Yew which is Rust. Qt for Wasm, which is a C++ Library. These are all different languages being used for the same thing via WebAssembly. You can take the native code written in these various languages, compile it down to the common WebAssembly format, and then your browser can run that module. It allows it to interact with the DOM. It allows it to bind to functions and APIs that are available through JavaScript and the other browser APIs. It allows you to run the same code that maybe you have on your server, sharing data types, and all these kinds of things. There are some really fascinating use cases for WebAssembly on the client side. We’re here to talk about WebAssembly on the server.

Runtimes – Wasm outside the Browser

How do you run WebAssembly outside of the browser? You need a runtime. A runtime is an application that runs on the command line or via a static library that allows you to load your Wasm module and run it as if it was just any other program. Wasmer, WasmTime, Wasm3, WAVM, and Lucet, these are some common emerging Wasm runtimes that have been coming out from the community as of late. They’re really starting to build this ecosystem of capabilities to run Wasm anywhere. You could theoretically run them on anything from a massively powered server, down to a Raspberry Pi or an embedded system. This is really great because it decouples Wasm from the V8 runtime and the browser’s cage that it’s been in for a long time. It allows us to add capabilities to Wasm to make it useful on the server.

Wasm at the Edge – Enhancing Services

Wasm at the edge is not a new concept actually, it’s something that has been available for quite a while now. Some examples you may have heard of are Fastly Compute@Edge and Cloudflare Workers, and this has come around because of the performance that has been found in compiling languages to WebAssembly. You’ve been able to take your Rust or C++ code and bring it down to this common format, WebAssembly. Then these cloud providers can actually run these modules in an extremely lightweight manner, right at the edge of their network. In the Cloudflare Worker example, they have data centers all around the world, and so, in less than 30 milliseconds away from any given user, your WebAssembly module can be triggered to modify requests, do caching, do all sorts of different tasks. Because this format is so lightweight, and because the capabilities of the native code are so powerful, there’s unlimited different possibilities that you can use this style of Wasm module. They’ve been adding capabilities steadily for a while now and there’s some very interesting potential going on here.

Community Projects – Server-side Wasm

There’s also a number of very compelling community projects that have been coming out as of late. If you’ve been to some WebAssembly related conferences like WebAssembly Live or the WebAssembly Summit, this past year, there were some really great presentations about a couple of different projects that are being built to make WebAssembly more useful outside of the web browser context. Something like waPC, which is the WebAssembly Procedure Call standard, is adding to the ability for WebAssembly modules and the host code to communicate with each other via procedure calls. While having your module interact with a Go server that is hosting the module, previously may have been pretty difficult just because of the limited memory layout of WebAssembly, waPC simplifies that and provides a standardized method for doing that across FFI communication. They’ve been adding all sorts of different features and language support. I think they support all sorts of different languages like TypeScript and Rust and C++. That’s a really great project.

Then, waSCC is a framework, a project that is allowing for the actor pattern to be implemented using WebAssembly modules. Being able to bind capabilities to your Wasm modules, things like a Redis Cache, or an HTTP server can be dynamically bound to a WebAssembly module. Those capabilities can be controlled very tightly by the host that is running the module. The modules themselves, the code that was written for those modules doesn’t need to be directly aware of them, they can just bind to a set of APIs. It gives you really powerful control over what is running in your server-side code. Then we have things like SSVM, which is a project for running WebAssembly with applications like AI models, and for blockchain applications like smart contracts. This is an emerging project that’s been gaining some steam. I suggest you go check that one out. I think it’s pretty interesting. Then there’s Atmo. The goal of Atmo is to enable a more seamless experience when building WebAssembly modules for the server. It’s going to be making things much easier for developers when wanting to run WebAssembly in a web service type scenario.

How Wasm Can fit into a Server-side System

How can Wasm fit into a server-side system? We’ve been seeing some patterns emerge lately in the server-side development community, which is the desire to simplify, and that is coming in the form of things like Functions as a Service, or serverless technology. There’s AWS Lambda, OpenFaaS the serverless framework, things like that are really designed to make things simpler, again, because things have gotten much more complex in the last 5 or 10 years, with the rise of microservices and whatnot. It’s made things more difficult. Bootstrapping a simple service should not require you to need to understand all sorts of container runtimes and different virtual networking technologies, so the desire to simplify has been around for quite a while. This idea of creating simple, unified function-based applications is something that’s been coming around for quite a while now. I think that Wasm can really help with this goal by building these very tightly constrained, highly composable modules from various languages, really whatever you want, and fitting them together into whatever configuration that you need for your application, is pretty compelling. Allowing some framework or hosted system or platform to really take on all of the complexity and just let you write these functions, that’s going to be a pretty great way to build out different types of services, all the way from the simplest cases, all the way up to more complex and larger typography systems.

Wasm Module Bundles

This idea of Wasm module bundles is something that I’ve been exploring with the Atmo project, and that is the ability to write a whole bunch of standalone, singular functions that each perform a very tightly constrained job. Then being able to describe in a declarative manner, how those different functions should be triggered. Then bundling all of that up into a single thing that can be easily deployed. It’s been pretty interesting and I think it’s very ergonomic from the developer’s perspective but also from the DevOps side, being able to package up your code in this very simple way. Then allow a framework or a platform to deploy those functions onto a cluster that you just don’t necessarily need to understand the structure of, and knowing that it will handle taking the various inputs, whether they’re events, or HTTP requests, or whatever, and letting the framework schedule these functions. Trigger them as needed. Then handle the output, is a pretty interesting use case for Wasm. It’s these modules because they come out so small, they are compiled down to a very small size, it makes a lot of things really easy. You can put them into an S3 bucket, or you can put them into a registry like WAPM, which is Wasmer’s WebAssembly package manager. You can use things like that to very easily deploy these bundles to your server, and have your WebAssembly platform or framework, fetch them, deploy them, and then run them seamlessly.

Suborbital Development Platform

I’m going to give a 30 second overview of the suborbital project that I’ve been working on for the past year or so, and that is combining these three things to allow for this type of workflow. Vektor is an edge router. It handles various different inputs like HTTP requests and events and whatnot, and allows them to be routed to various modules or jobs. Then Hive, the job scheduler can then flexibly and scalably run these functions and manage their execution. Then Grav is a messaging mesh. This is a term that I think I made up, which is really just allowing your message bus to operate in concert with your service mesh rather than having a centralized broker, like most messaging or eventing systems. Grav actually is decentralized, and so it uses your service mesh to facilitate asynchronous communication between nodes in your system, to make sure that your system is scalable, and you’re not hitting the pitfalls of various RPC or HTTP communication when you’re looking at services.

Put It All Together – Wasm Powered Server Framework

These three things are the building blocks. They’re all in beta right now. They’ve been quite successful. I’ve seen some really great results out of these three. On their own, they don’t allow for what I’ve just been talking about, which is these easily deployable Wasm module bundles. The new project wasn’t quite ready in time for this presentation. Hopefully, there will be an initial alpha release, and that is what I’m calling Atmo. Atmo uses those building blocks of the router, the job scheduler, and the messaging mesh to create that Wasm powered platform or framework that I was alluding to. The goal of Atmo is really to take those Wasm bundles. It’ll take your bag of functions, you can really just build any number of functions. Package them together into a bundle, which is essentially just a compressed archive, along with a declarative description of how those functions should interact with the outside world based on different inputs. Then Atmo will use those three building blocks to handle whatever you describe.

The implication here is that you will no longer need to care about Docker images or you’ll no longer need to care about scheduling on a container runtime, you can just let Atmo run in your cluster. It will autoscale itself using whatever technology you’re running it on, whether it’s an autoscaling group, or Kubernetes, or whatever. Then it’s designed to intelligently run those functions as described when you deploy them. You can visit suborbital.dev to get emails about the project as it updates. That project there, github.com/suborbital/atmo, should be live by the time this conference exists. I’m hoping that I’ll be able to have some examples in that repo that you can look at where functions can be very easily composed to build the business logic and the various different workflows that you’re used to, with things like Lambda, and recreated in a compelling way that makes sense because of the power of WebAssembly.

Now Go Build with WebAssembly

I hope this triggers some desire to try WebAssembly. It’s a really great technology. I’ve seen some really incredible things built with it. I do believe that five years from now, WebAssembly will be just as prevalent as Docker and whatnot. I think we’re really early on in this ride. I think it’s really too early to tell exactly what the prevailing method of building with WebAssembly will be just because the ecosystem and the community is so young. I’m really hoping that this gets you a little bit excited at the potential. I think it’s going to be very interesting to see how it all unfolds.

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Mini book: The InfoQ eMag: Building Microservices in Java

MMS Founder
MMS InfoQ

Article originally posted on InfoQ. Visit InfoQ

Over the past few years, the Java community has been offered a wide variety of microservices-based frameworks to build enterprise, cloud-native and serverless applications. Perhaps you’ve been asking yourself questions such as: What are the benefits of building and maintaining a microservices-based application? Should I migrate my existing monolith-based application to microservices? Is it worth the effort to migrate? Which microservices framework should I commit to using? What are MicroProfile and Jakarta EE? What happened to Java EE? How does Spring Boot fit into all of this? What is GraalVM?

For those of us that may be old enough to remember, the concept of microservices emerged from the service-oriented architecture (SOA) that was introduced nearly 20 years ago. SOA applications used technologies such as the Web Services Description Language (WSDL) and Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) to build enterprise applications. Today, however, the Representational State Transfer (REST) protocol is the primary method for microservices to communicate with each other via HTTP.

Since 2018, we’ve seen three new open-source frameworks – Micronaut, Helidon and Quarkus – emerge to complement the already existing Java middleware open-source products such as Open Liberty, WildFly, Payara and Tomitribe. We have also seen the emergence of GraalVM, a polyglot virtual machine and platform created by Oracle Labs that, among other things, can convert applications to native code.

In this eMag, you’ll be introduced to some of these microservices frameworks, MicroProfile, a set of APIs that optimizes enterprise Java for a microservices architecture, and GraalVM. We’ve hand-picked three full-length articles and facilitated a virtual panel to explore these frameworks.

Free download

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Machines Already Do This More Than People, and 1 Small Company Is Profiting From the Trend

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Posted on mongodb google news. Visit mongodb google news

As of 2018, the amount of machine-generated data has surpassed the amount of human-generated data. Whether its a smart device in your home or a sensor on your car, these machines are generating more and more data everyday and this is only expected to increase in coming years. Much of the data is unstructured but there could be valuable insights for businesses if this data could be captured and stored. And that’s where a little company called MongoDB (NASDAQ:MDB) comes in.

In this video clip from Motley Fool Live, recorded on July 15, Fool contributor Brian Withers explains to fellow contributor Jon Quast what MongoDB is and how it’s profiting from the rise of machines.

Brian Withers: I’m going to talk a little bit about the rise of machines. There was a slide that I saw just recently that was out of Applied Materials. So Applied Materials has this slide that they put in a recent presentation. They showed data generation by category. You can see this is zettabytes. I don’t know what a zettabyte is, but it’s bigger than a gigabyte, for sure. It’s just tremendously large. They claim that in 2018, the amount of data that was being generated and consumed by machines, passed over the amount that was generated and consumed by humans.

We are now in a machine-driven world from a data perspective and just look, this is going exponential here. The amount of data being generated by industrial IoT, so Internet of Things. Think of it as machines talking to other machines. As far as whether it’s sensors on tanks or robots or drones, or just other conveyors talking to other pieces of equipment, the amount of data that’s being generated by machines is just massive and growing exponentially.

To me, this is the, if you’re looking at database to handle all those data generation, you wouldn’t want one that was built some 50 years ago in a world where data was very proprietary and not in the cloud and we didn’t have cellphones, and enter MongoDB and they’re already doing this. Toyota Material Handling is one of their customers. You can see the clip from the YouTube video that I pulled. Just look at all of these data points they’re getting and it’s basically all of the things in this warehouse are communicating with other machines. They went with MongoDB for all of these wonderful scaling reasons over there. I can’t help but think that part of the reason is it’s just the massive amount of data that’s being generated and the way that MongoDB is set up for data in a new way for the cloud generation. Was really fascinated by this chart and then the fact that it plays into MongoDB’s strategy.

Jon Quast: Brian, just real quick, a zettabyte is 1 trillion gigabytes.

Withers: Oh my gosh. [laughs] That’s a lot.

Quast: That’s a lot of gigabytes. [laughs] I’m not familiar with MongoDB personally. Are they more into the machine-generated data?

Withers: They make a general purpose database that is in what’s called the NoSQL or document-style database. If you look at the top databases in use today, Oracle, SAP, those kinds of things, they are actually built on a structure of a SQL database which is more rows and columns. Like I said, that was developed 50 years ago and it just can’t scale with today’s demand. You think something like Fortnite is a game that’s powered by MongoDB, and you just think of 100 people landing on an island and duking it out in the Fortnite Battle Royale and you just think of the performance that’s required for that database to keep up with all of the activity that’s going on, where everybody is and what they have and all that kind of stuff. MongoDB has been able to scale that. But they also play into different verticals such as the industrial and machine. It’s really just a general purpose database for not only just regular data, but all other data that fits in this document format.

This article represents the opinion of the writer, who may disagree with the “official” recommendation position of a Motley Fool premium advisory service. We’re motley! Questioning an investing thesis — even one of our own — helps us all think critically about investing and make decisions that help us become smarter, happier, and richer.

Article originally posted on mongodb google news. Visit mongodb google news

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Node-RED 2.0 Improves Developer Experience with New Flow Debugger and Flow Linter

MMS Founder
MMS Sergio De Simone

Article originally posted on InfoQ. Visit InfoQ

IoT-focused low-code programming tool Node-RED reaches version 2.0, bringing flow debugger and flow linter to help programmers find bugs in their flows.

Node-RED 2.0 has mostly focused on removing support for older versions of Node.js and update a number of internal dependencies. Still, the new flow debugger and flow linter, both available as plugins, will be a welcome addition to most developers.

Node-RED flow debugger allows you to set breakpoints on node ports, so your flow will stop each time a new message is received on that port. This makes it possible to inspect all the messages that are queued and waiting to be processed. You can also execute the flow one message at a time, or delete a queued message. This possibility is especially relevant since Node-RED went async a couple of years ago, thus making the relative order of message handling less intuitive.

At the moment, the flow debugger does not support conditional breakpoints nor editing queued messages, but both features are in the works. Likewise, it is not currently possible to pause only a subset of nodes, but it will be in a future release.

Node-RED flow linter, called nrlint can be used to identify potential problems in a flow. nrlint uses a set of rule to identify potentially incorrect uses, such as leaving the output of an HTTP In node not connected to any HTTP Response nodes. nrlint can also be integrated with eslint, which can be useful in case your flow includes custom JavaScript code.

The Node-RED linter uses a browser Worker thread and provides its results in a separate sidebar, allowing you also to quickly navigate to the areas of your flow that need attention. nrliter can be alternatively run from the command line to integrate the linting step in a CI pipeline.

Still on the developer experience front, Node-RED 2.0 replaces its code editor ACE with Monaco. Monaco is the editor engine that powers Microsoft Visual Studio Code and will make all Visual Studio Code developers feel at home in Node-RED 2.0. Monaco is enabld by default, but user can switch back to ACE it they require so.

Other notable improvements to Node-RED 2.0 include a new node-red admin init command to easily create a correctly configured settings file; improved support for calling external modules from Function nodes; the Report By Exception (RBE) node, used to discard messages when their data has not changed, is now part of the default palette and has been more meaningfully renamed to Filter; and more.

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Global NoSQL Software Market Top Manufacturers: MongoDB, Amazon, ArangoDB, Azure Cosmos …

MMS Founder
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Posted on mongodb google news. Visit mongodb google news

This detailed summary and report documentation of the NoSQL Software market includes market size, market segmentation, market position, regional and national market sizes, competitive economy, sales research, optimization of the value chain, trade policy, the impact of the players, latest trends, market strategic growth, optimization of the value chain, and analysis of opportunity.

Market Segmentation Assessment
The study presents market volumes, execution, the share of the market, product growth trends, and qualitative and quantitative analysis to estimate micro ¯o-economic factors that affect growth roadmap. The demand in NoSQL Software market was fully anticipated over the forecast timeframe. The study includes recent industry developments such as growth factors, restrictions, and new market news.

We Have Recent Updates of NoSQL Software Market in Sample [email protected] https://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/request-sample/4555687?utm_source=puja7s

Vendor Profiling: NoSQL Software Market, 2020-28:

MongoDB
Amazon
ArangoDB
Azure Cosmos DB
Couchbase
MarkLogic
RethinkDB
CouchDB
SQL-RD
OrientDB
RavenDB
Redis
Microsoft

The market share analysis offers valuable insights into international markets, such as trends for development, competitive environmental assessment, and the region’s highest growth status. Regulation and development ideas and an overview of manufacturing processes and price structures are provided.

Analysis by Type:

Cloud Based
Web Based

Analysis by Application:

E-Commerce
Social Networking
Data Analytics
Data Storage
Others

Regional Analysis:
The report evaluates the proliferation of the NoSQL Software market in the nations like France, Italy USA, Japan, Mexico, Brazil, Canada, Russia, Germany, U.K, South Korea, and Southeast Asia. The report also undergoes meticulous evaluation of the regions such as Middle East & Africa, Europe North, America, Latin America, and Asia Pacific.

North America (U.S., Canada, Mexico)
Europe (U.K., France, Germany, Spain, Italy, Central & Eastern Europe, CIS)
Asia Pacific (China, Japan, South Korea, ASEAN, India, Rest of Asia Pacific)
Latin America (Brazil, Rest of L.A.)
Middle East and Africa (Turkey, GCC, Rest of Middle East)

Browse Full Report with Facts and Figures of NoSQL Software Market Report at @ https://www.orbisresearch.com/reports/index/global-nosql-software-market-size-status-and-forecast-2020-2026?utm_source=puja7s

The report highlights the parties that work along the supply chain, intellectual property rights, technical information of the products and services. The study aims to provide information about the market that is easily not accessible, and understandable information that helps the market participants make informed decisions. The study identifies the untapped avenues, and factors shaping the revenue potential of the NoSQL Software market. The report provides a detailed analysis of the demand and consumption patterns of the customers in the NoSQL Software market provides region-wise assessment for a detailed analysis.

NoSQL Software Market Key Highlights
• Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of the NoSQL Software market during the forecast period 2022-2027 estimating the return on investments.
• Detailed analysis of the influencing factors that will assist the NoSQL Software participants to grow in the next five years with its full potential
• Estimation of the NoSQL Software market size, market share by value and by volume, and contribution of the parent market in the NoSQL Software market.
• Consumer behavior with respect to current and upcoming trends.
• Analysis of the competitive landscape and insights on the product portfolios, technology integration boosting growth, and new product launches by the prominent vendors in the NoSQL Software market.

Do You Have Any Query or Specific Requirement? Ask Our Industry [email protected] https://www.orbisresearch.com/contacts/enquiry-before-buying/4555687?utm_source=puja7s

The business report also tracks competition data such as fusions, alliances, and market growth targets. This report also gives a better understanding about the impact of this change on both consumers and society as well. Detailed information on the product portfolios and pricing patterns of the leading players allows the existing and new participants in the NoSQL Software market to squeeze cost prices.

This study addresses further the fundamental perspectives on the business economy, high-growth markets, countries with high growth, and industry variations in business factors, and limitations. Further, the latest report provides a strategic evaluation and a thorough analysis of the industry, strategies, products, and development capabilities of NoSQL Software business leaders.

Table of Contents
Chapter One: Report Overview
1.1 Study Scope
1.2 Key Market Segments
1.3 Players Covered: Ranking by NoSQL Software Revenue
1.4 Market Analysis by Type
1.4.1 NoSQL Software Market Size Growth Rate by Type: 2020 VS 2028
1.5 Market by Application
1.5.1 NoSQL Software Market Share by Application: 2020 VS 2028
1.6 Study Objectives
1.7 Years Considered

Chapter Two: Growth Trends by Regions
2.1 NoSQL Software Market Perspective (2018-2028)
2.2 NoSQL Software Growth Trends by Regions
2.2.1 NoSQL Software Market Size by Regions: 2018 VS 2020 VS 2028
2.2.2 NoSQL Software Historic Market Share by Regions (2018-2020)
2.2.3 NoSQL Software Forecasted Market Size by Regions (2021-2028)
2.3 Industry Trends and Growth Strategy
2.3.1 Market Top Trends
2.3.2 Market Drivers
2.3.3 Market Challenges
2.3.4 Porter’s Five Forces Analysis
2.3.5 NoSQL Software Market Growth Strategy
2.3.6 Primary Interviews with Key NoSQL Software Players (Opinion Leaders)

Chapter Three: Competition Landscape by Key Players
3.1 Top NoSQL Software Players by Market Size
3.1.1 Top NoSQL Software Players by Revenue (2018-2020)
3.1.2 NoSQL Software Revenue Market Share by Players (2018-2020)
3.1.3 NoSQL Software Market Share by Company Type
3.2 NoSQL Software Market Concentration Ratio
3.2.1 NoSQL Software Market Concentration Ratio (CRChapter Five: and HHI)
3.2.2 Top Chapter Ten: and Top 5 Companies by NoSQL Software Revenue in 2020
3.3 NoSQL Software Key Players Head office and Area Served
3.4 Key Players NoSQL Software Product Solution and Service
3.5 Date of Enter into NoSQL Software Market
3.6 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

The NoSQL Software market research study curated in the report provides information about the current trends and future market dynamics to the market participants. The report extensively analyzes the significant market factors such as current and future trends, drivers, risks and opportunities, and major developments prevalent in the NoSQL Software market.

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Infrastructure Engineer

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Infrastructure Engineer

About Us:

We are PIMCO, a leading global asset management firm. We manage investments and develop solutions across the full spectrum of asset classes, strategies and vehicles: fixed income, equities, commodities, asset allocation, ETFs, hedge funds and private equity. PIMCO is one of the largest investment managers, actively managing more than $1.92 trillion in assets for clients around the world. PIMCO has over 2,800 employees in 17 offices globally. PIMCO is recognized as an innovator, industry thought leader and trusted advisor to our clients.

PIMCO is one of the world’s premier fixed income investment managers with thousands of professionals around the world united in a single purpose: creating opportunities for our clients in every environment. Since 1971, we have brought innovation and expertise to our partnership with the institutions, financial advisors and millions of individual investors who entrust us with their assets. We aspire to cultivate performance and leadership through empowering our people, diversity of thought, and a commitment to an inclusive culture that engages in our global communities.

Position Description:

Pacific Investment Management Company LLC (PIMCO) seeks an Infrastructure Engineer for its Austin, TX location. Job ID 31168

Duties: Build and maintain PIMCO’s big data infrastructure, including the Cloudera and MapR platforms. Design and implement data processing pipelines using Hadoop, Map Reduce, YARN, Spark, Hive, Kafka, Avro, Parquet, SQL and NoSQL stores. Work with Team Lead and Architect to identify business requirements and develop solutions that meet business needs. Conduct data ingestion and transformation using Scala/JAVA. Provide Big Data Exploration function, including profiling, quality and transformation of data. Design robust ETL/ELT workflows, schedulers and event based triggers. Provide resource management with YARN. Perform benchmarking on Hadoop cluster using TeraSort, NNBench, and TestDFSIO, and report findings to Big Data testing team to ensure functionality of cluster services meets business requirements. Perform smoke test and regression test to check functionality and to ensure implemented changes do not affect existing functionalities. Support ICEDQ, Informatica Infrastructure and assist Oracle team with BDA upgrade. Support and maintain Oracle’s Big Data Appliance, and NoSQL stores including HBase and Mongo. Create a Functional Requirement Document (FRD) on capacity planning of the various resources of the cluster.

Position Requirements:

Requirements: Master’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Information Systems or related field, and two (2) years of experience in the position offered or related position. Full term of experience must include: Utilizing Apache Hadoop, Map-Reduce, HDFS, Pig, Hive, Hbase, ZooKeeper, Sqoop, Flume, and OOZIE to perform input/output processing and schedule workflow jobs; Utilizing Core Java, J2EE, SQL, PL/SQL, Python, and Unix Shell Scripting to conduct programming and time series analysis for data manipulation; Engaging in Cluster maintenance, including adding and removing cluster nodes, cluster monitoring and troubleshooting, and managing and reviewing data backups, and Hadoop log files; Working with end users to gather and analyze business and functional requirements, and developing system designs and specifications that meets business needs; Analyzing and creating business models, logical specifications and/or user requirements to develop solutions for application environment; Designing, developing and implementing software applications, including creating system procedures and ensuring normal functioning of applications; Maintaining, modifying, testing and debugging programs, including amending flow charts, developing detailed programming logic, implementing coding changes, writing source code, and preparing test data; Revising and refining programs to improve performance of application software; Executing functional test plans, validating test results, and preparing documentation and data for analysis.

Background check and drug screening required prior to employment. Pacific Investment Management Company LLC is an EEO/AA Employer. This position is eligible for incentives pursuant to Pacific Investment Management Company LLC’s Employee Referral Program.

Benefits:

PIMCO is committed to offering a comprehensive portfolio of employee benefits designed to support the health and well-being of you and your family. Benefits vary by location but may include:

  • Medical, dental, and vision coverage
  • Life insurance and travel coverage
  • 401(k) (defined contribution) retirement savings, retirement plan, pension contribution from your first day of employment
  • Work/life programs such as flexible work arrangements, parental leave and support, employee assistance plan, commuter benefits, health club discounts, and educational/CFA certification reimbursement programs
  • Community involvement opportunities with The PIMCO Foundation in each PIMCO office

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Stock Upgrades: Mongodb Shows Rising Relative Strength

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Mongodb (MDB) saw a positive improvement to its Relative Strength (RS) Rating on Tuesday, rising from 79 to 83.

When looking for the best stocks to buy and watch, one factor to watch closely is relative price strength.

This unique rating measures technical performance by showing how a stock’s price action over the last 52 weeks compares to that of other stocks on the major indexes.

Over 100 years of market history reveals that the top-performing stocks tend to have an RS Rating of over 80 as they launch their biggest runs.


Looking For The Best Stocks To Buy And Watch? Start Here


Mongodb is working on a cup with handle with a 393.73 buy point. See if the stock can break out in volume at least 40% above average. Keep in mind that it’s a later-stage consolidation, and those entail more risk.

While the company’s bottom line growth dropped last quarter from 0% to -15%, revenue grew 39%, up from 38% in the prior report. The company is expected to report its latest performance numbers on or around Sep. 2.

Mongodb earns the No. 12 rank among its peers in the Computer Software-Database industry group. Oracle (ORCL) and Workiva (WK) are also among the group’s highest-rated stocks.

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Database Software MongoDB Stock Shows Rising Relative Strength To 83

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Posted on mongodb google news. Visit mongodb google news

MongoDB (MDB) saw a positive improvement to its Relative Strength (RS) Rating on Tuesday, rising from 79 to 83.

When looking for the best stocks to buy and watch, one factor to watch closely is relative price strength.

This unique rating measures technical performance by showing how a stock’s price action over the last 52 weeks compares to that of other stocks on the major indexes.

Over 100 years of market history reveals that the top-performing stocks tend to have an RS Rating of over 80 as they launch their biggest runs.


Looking For The Best Stocks To Buy And Watch? Start Here


Is MongoDB Stock A Buy?

MongoDB stock is working on a cup with handle with a 393.73 buy point. See if the stock can break out in volume at least 40% above average. Keep in mind that it’s a later-stage consolidation, and those entail more risk. Read “Looking For The Next Big Stock Market Winners? Start With These 3 Steps” for more tips. Also, check out “Stocks To Buy And Watch: Top IPOs, Big And Small Caps, Growth Stocks.”

While the company’s bottom line growth dropped last quarter from 0% to -15%, revenue grew 39%, up from 38% in the prior report. The company is expected to report its latest performance numbers on or around Sep. 2.

MongoDB stock earns the No. 12 rank among its peers in the Computer Software-Database industry group. Oracle (ORCL) and Workiva (WK) are also among the group’s highest-rated stocks.

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Article originally posted on mongodb google news. Visit mongodb google news

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